x86: Mention how to boot a 64-bit kernel from U-Boot
[u-boot.git] / doc / uImage.FIT / x86-fit-boot.txt
1 Booting Linux on x86 with FIT
2 =============================
3
4 Background
5 ----------
6
7 (corrections to the text below are welcome)
8
9 Generally Linux x86 uses its own very complex booting method. There is a setup
10 binary which contains all sorts of parameters and a compressed self-extracting
11 binary for the kernel itself, often with a small built-in serial driver to
12 display decompression progress.
13
14 The x86 CPU has various processor modes. I am no expert on these, but my
15 understanding is that an x86 CPU (even a really new one) starts up in a 16-bit
16 'real' mode where only 1MB of memory is visible, moves to 32-bit 'protected'
17 mode where 4GB is visible (or more with special memory access techniques) and
18 then to 64-bit 'long' mode if 64-bit execution is required.
19
20 Partly the self-extracting nature of Linux was introduced to cope with boot
21 loaders that were barely capable of loading anything. Even changing to 32-bit
22 mode was something of a challenge, so putting this logic in the kernel seemed
23 to make sense.
24
25 Bit by bit more and more logic has been added to this post-boot pre-Linux
26 wrapper:
27
28 - Changing to 32-bit mode
29 - Decompression
30 - Serial output (with drivers for various chips)
31 - Load address randomisation
32 - Elf loader complete with relocation (for the above)
33 - Random number generator via 3 methods (again for the above)
34 - Some sort of EFI mini-loader (1000+ glorious lines of code)
35 - Locating and tacking on a device tree and ramdisk
36
37 To my mind, if you sit back and look at things from first principles, this
38 doesn't make a huge amount of sense. Any boot loader worth its salts already
39 has most of the above features and more besides. The boot loader already knows
40 the layout of memory, has a serial driver, can decompress things, includes an
41 ELF loader and supports device tree and ramdisks. The decision to duplicate
42 all these features in a Linux wrapper caters for the lowest common
43 denominator: a boot loader which consists of a BIOS call to load something off
44 disk, followed by a jmp instruction.
45
46 (Aside: On ARM systems, we worry that the boot loader won't know where to load
47 the kernel. It might be easier to just provide that information in the image,
48 or in the boot loader rather than adding a self-relocator to put it in the
49 right place. Or just use ELF?
50
51 As a result, the x86 kernel boot process is needlessly complex. The file
52 format is also complex, and obfuscates the contents to a degree that it is
53 quite a challenge to extract anything from it. This bzImage format has become
54 so prevalent that is actually isn't possible to produce the 'raw' kernel build
55 outputs with the standard Makefile (as it is on ARM for example, at least at
56 the time of writing).
57
58 This document describes an alternative boot process which uses simple raw
59 images which are loaded into the right place by the boot loader and then
60 executed.
61
62
63 Build the kernel
64 ----------------
65
66 Note: these instructions assume a 32-bit kernel. U-Boot also supports directly
67 booting a 64-bit kernel by jumping into 64-bit mode first (see below).
68
69 You can build the kernel as normal with 'make'. This will create a file called
70 'vmlinux'. This is a standard ELF file and you can look at it if you like:
71
72 $ objdump -h vmlinux
73
74 vmlinux:     file format elf32-i386
75
76 Sections:
77 Idx Name          Size      VMA       LMA       File off  Algn
78   0 .text         00416850  81000000  01000000  00001000  2**5
79                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, CODE
80   1 .notes        00000024  81416850  01416850  00417850  2**2
81                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, READONLY, CODE
82   2 __ex_table    00000c50  81416880  01416880  00417880  2**3
83                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
84   3 .rodata       00154b9e  81418000  01418000  00419000  2**5
85                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
86   4 __bug_table   0000597c  8156cba0  0156cba0  0056dba0  2**0
87                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
88   5 .pci_fixup    00001b80  8157251c  0157251c  0057351c  2**2
89                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
90   6 .tracedata    00000024  8157409c  0157409c  0057509c  2**0
91                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
92   7 __ksymtab     00007ec0  815740c0  015740c0  005750c0  2**2
93                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
94   8 __ksymtab_gpl 00004a28  8157bf80  0157bf80  0057cf80  2**2
95                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
96   9 __ksymtab_strings 0001d6fc  815809a8  015809a8  005819a8  2**0
97                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, READONLY, DATA
98  10 __init_rodata 00001c3c  8159e0a4  0159e0a4  0059f0a4  2**2
99                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
100  11 __param       00000ff0  8159fce0  0159fce0  005a0ce0  2**2
101                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
102  12 __modver      00000330  815a0cd0  015a0cd0  005a1cd0  2**2
103                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
104  13 .data         00063000  815a1000  015a1000  005a2000  2**12
105                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, DATA
106  14 .init.text    0002f104  81604000  01604000  00605000  2**2
107                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, CODE
108  15 .init.data    00040cdc  81634000  01634000  00635000  2**12
109                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, DATA
110  16 .x86_cpu_dev.init 0000001c  81674cdc  01674cdc  00675cdc  2**2
111                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
112  17 .altinstructions 0000267c  81674cf8  01674cf8  00675cf8  2**0
113                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
114  18 .altinstr_replacement 00000942  81677374  01677374  00678374  2**0
115                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, READONLY, CODE
116  19 .iommu_table  00000014  81677cb8  01677cb8  00678cb8  2**2
117                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
118  20 .apicdrivers  00000004  81677cd0  01677cd0  00678cd0  2**2
119                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, DATA
120  21 .exit.text    00001a80  81677cd8  01677cd8  00678cd8  2**0
121                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, CODE
122  22 .data..percpu 00007880  8167a000  0167a000  0067b000  2**12
123                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, DATA
124  23 .smp_locks    00003000  81682000  01682000  00683000  2**2
125                   CONTENTS, ALLOC, LOAD, RELOC, READONLY, DATA
126  24 .bss          000a1000  81685000  01685000  00686000  2**12
127                   ALLOC
128  25 .brk          00424000  81726000  01726000  00686000  2**0
129                   ALLOC
130  26 .comment      00000049  00000000  00000000  00686000  2**0
131                   CONTENTS, READONLY
132  27 .GCC.command.line 0003e055  00000000  00000000  00686049  2**0
133                   CONTENTS, READONLY
134  28 .debug_aranges 0000f4c8  00000000  00000000  006c40a0  2**3
135                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
136  29 .debug_info   0440b0df  00000000  00000000  006d3568  2**0
137                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
138  30 .debug_abbrev 0022a83b  00000000  00000000  04ade647  2**0
139                   CONTENTS, READONLY, DEBUGGING
140  31 .debug_line   004ead0d  00000000  00000000  04d08e82  2**0
141                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
142  32 .debug_frame  0010a960  00000000  00000000  051f3b90  2**2
143                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
144  33 .debug_str    001b442d  00000000  00000000  052fe4f0  2**0
145                   CONTENTS, READONLY, DEBUGGING
146  34 .debug_loc    007c7fa9  00000000  00000000  054b291d  2**0
147                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
148  35 .debug_ranges 00098828  00000000  00000000  05c7a8c8  2**3
149                   CONTENTS, RELOC, READONLY, DEBUGGING
150
151 There is also the setup binary mentioned earlier. This is at
152 arch/x86/boot/setup.bin and is about 12KB in size. It includes the command
153 line and various settings need by the kernel. Arguably the boot loader should
154 provide all of this also, but setting it up is some complex that the kernel
155 helps by providing a head start.
156
157 As you can see the code loads to address 0x01000000 and everything else
158 follows after that. We could load this image using the 'bootelf' command but
159 we would still need to provide the setup binary. This is not supported by
160 U-Boot although I suppose you could mostly script it. This would permit the
161 use of a relocatable kernel.
162
163 All we need to boot is the vmlinux file and the setup.bin file.
164
165
166 Create a FIT
167 ------------
168
169 To create a FIT you will need a source file describing what should go in the
170 FIT. See kernel.its for an example for x86 and also instructions on setting
171 the 'arch' value for booting 64-bit kernels if desired. Put this into a file
172 called image.its.
173
174 Note that setup is loaded to the special address of 0x90000 (a special address
175 you just have to know) and the kernel is loaded to 0x01000000 (the address you
176 saw above). This means that you will need to load your FIT to a different
177 address so that U-Boot doesn't overwrite it when decompressing. Something like
178 0x02000000 will do so you can set CONFIG_SYS_LOAD_ADDR to that.
179
180 In that example the kernel is compressed with lzo. Also we need to provide a
181 flat binary, not an ELF. So the steps needed to set things are are:
182
183    # Create a flat binary
184    objcopy -O binary vmlinux vmlinux.bin
185
186    # Compress it into LZO format
187    lzop vmlinux.bin
188
189    # Build a FIT image
190    mkimage -f image.its image.fit
191
192 (be careful to run the mkimage from your U-Boot tools directory since it
193 will have x86_setup support.)
194
195 You can take a look at the resulting fit file if you like:
196
197 $ dumpimage -l image.fit
198 FIT description: Simple image with single Linux kernel on x86
199 Created:         Tue Oct  7 10:57:24 2014
200  Image 0 (kernel@1)
201   Description:  Vanilla Linux kernel
202   Created:      Tue Oct  7 10:57:24 2014
203   Type:         Kernel Image
204   Compression:  lzo compressed
205   Data Size:    4591767 Bytes = 4484.15 kB = 4.38 MB
206   Architecture: Intel x86
207   OS:           Linux
208   Load Address: 0x01000000
209   Entry Point:  0x00000000
210   Hash algo:    sha1
211   Hash value:   446b5163ebfe0fb6ee20cbb7a8501b263cd92392
212  Image 1 (setup@1)
213   Description:  Linux setup.bin
214   Created:      Tue Oct  7 10:57:24 2014
215   Type:         x86 setup.bin
216   Compression:  uncompressed
217   Data Size:    12912 Bytes = 12.61 kB = 0.01 MB
218   Hash algo:    sha1
219   Hash value:   a1f2099cf47ff9816236cd534c77af86e713faad
220  Default Configuration: 'config@1'
221  Configuration 0 (config@1)
222   Description:  Boot Linux kernel
223   Kernel:       kernel@1
224
225
226 Booting the FIT
227 ---------------
228
229 To make it boot you need to load it and then use 'bootm' to boot it. A
230 suitable script to do this from a network server is:
231
232    bootp
233    tftp image.fit
234    bootm
235
236 This will load the image from the network and boot it. The command line (from
237 the 'bootargs' environment variable) will be passed to the kernel.
238
239 If you want a ramdisk you can add it as normal with FIT. If you want a device
240 tree then x86 doesn't normally use those - it has ACPI instead.
241
242
243 Why Bother?
244 -----------
245
246 1. It demystifies the process of booting an x86 kernel
247 2. It allows use of the standard U-Boot boot file format
248 3. It allows U-Boot to perform decompression - problems will provide an error
249 message and you are still in the boot loader. It is possible to investigate.
250 4. It avoids all the pre-loader code in the kernel which is quite complex to
251 follow
252 5. You can use verified/secure boot and other features which haven't yet been
253 added to the pre-Linux
254 6. It makes x86 more like other architectures in the way it boots a kernel.
255 You can potentially use the same file format for the kernel, and the same
256 procedure for building and packaging it.
257
258
259 References
260 ----------
261
262 In the Linux kernel, Documentation/x86/boot.txt defines the boot protocol for
263 the kernel including the setup.bin format. This is handled in U-Boot in
264 arch/x86/lib/zimage.c and arch/x86/lib/bootm.c.
265
266 Various files in the same directory as this file describe the FIT format.
267
268
269 --
270 Simon Glass
271 sjg@chromium.org
272 7-Oct-2014